Awb Onesky vs. Zhumell Z130 | What’s the Difference?

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Awb Onesky Vs Zhumell z130

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The key difference between the Awb Onesky and Zhumell Z130 is that the Awb Onesky is on collimation. You can collimate the Awb Onesky, but you can’t do that to the Zhumell Z130. Other key differences are the price and portability. The Awb Onesky costs around twice as much as the Zhumell Z130, but it is also more portable.

When it comes to telescopes, there are a lot of different brands and models to choose from. It can be difficult to decide which is the right fit for you.

The Awb Onesky and Zhumell telescopes are two popular models that offer different features. So, what’s the difference between them?

In this blog post, I will compare two popular telescope models: the Awb Onesky and the Zhumell Z130. I will discuss the differences between these two telescopes and their pros and cons. By the end of this post, you should have a better idea of which telescope is right for you.

Overview of the Awb Onesky

OneSky is a good choice. The OneSky has a larger aperture than the usual beginner scopes, which typically range from 50 to 114 mm (2 to 4.5 in) in size. Its aperture is a little over 130 mm (5 in).

Despite this, the scope is relatively small, partly due to the paraboloidal mirror’s 650 mm(25.6 in) and focal length at f/5.

However, a collapsing truss tube that reduces the telescope to 388 mm (14.5 in) in a matter of seconds is what really makes the OneSky small. With an integrated handle on the Dobsonian alt-azimuth mount, moving this 6.3 kg (14 lb) telescope to and from your viewing location is very easy. The mount is very stable and reasonably smooth in motion.

The telescope accessories are also excellent, dependable options. Two quality Plossl eyepieces with focal lengths of 25 mm (1 in) and 10 mm (0.4 in) each is provided.

These provide 26 and 65 power magnifications, perfect for this scope. These eyepieces have 1.7 and 0.7-degree fields of view, respectively.

To assist in pointing the telescope at the desired target, the OneSky uses a Red Dot finder, sometimes referred to as a reflex sight. A Red Dot finder has a thin curved window oriented at 45 degrees. 

This window reflects the red LED light into the viewer’s eye, creating a virtual representation of the dot overlaid on the sky. The object is centered in a low-power telescope’s field of view when the dot is on the target you want to see.

The OneSky also has a phone adapter to allow you to use your smartphone as a camera. By downloading the appropriate app, you can use your phone for astrophotography or a live stream of what you see through the telescope.

The eyepiece holder is also threaded to accept standard filter sizes, so you can enhance your views or protect your eyes as needed. The Awb Onesky is a great choice for beginners because it is easy to use and set up. It is also very affordable, costing around $200.

Advantages of the Awb Onesky

The Awb Onesky has several advantages.

Includes a Cheshire Eyepiece Collimation Tool

The first advantage is that it includes a Cheshire eyepiece collimation tool. This tool is used to align the optics of the telescope.

It is an important tool for beginners because it can be difficult to know if the optics are aligned properly. Without this tool, you would have to buy it separately.

Finding Objects in The Sky

The OneSky also has a red dot finder, which makes it easy to find objects in the night sky. The red dot finder is a small, lightweight device that projects a red dot onto the night sky.

You can use the red dot to find objects and then look at them through the telescope.

It Is Portable

Another advantage of the OneSky is that it is portable. It weighs only 14 pounds and can be easily carried from one location to another.

Disadvantages of the Awb Onesky

The Awb Onesky also has some disadvantages.

The Aperture is Not as Large as Some Other Models

One disadvantage is that the aperture is not as large as some other models. The OneSky has an aperture of 130 mm, while some other models have an aperture of 150 mm or more.

It Does Not Include a Barlow Lens

Another disadvantage is that it does not include a Barlow lens. A Barlow lens is an additional lens you can use with the telescope to increase the magnification.

Overview of the Zhumell Z130

The Zhumell Z130 is a Dobsonian telescope with a 130 mm (aperture) reflector optical tube and a simple alt-azimuth mount. It is an easy-to-use telescope that is great for beginners or anyone who wants to get into astronomy.

The Z130 is a compact and portable telescope that can be set up in minutes.

The Zhumell Z130 has two eyepieces (25 mm and 12. mm) and a red dot finder. It also has a phone adapter to take pictures or live stream what you see through the telescope.

The Zhumell Z130 is a great value for the price and is a good choice for anyone looking for an easy-to-use telescope.

The 130mm parabolic primary mirror in the Zhumell Z130 Portable Reflector Telescope is a high-end feature not commonly found in telescopes of this size. The parabolic mirror eliminates spherical aberration and other visual flaws, which results in significantly sharper pictures.

All optical surfaces, including the primary mirror, have high-reflectivity coatings from Zhumell. More than 90% of the light will be transmitted, allowing for brighter views of even faint objects like nebulae.

You’ll also get two fully multi-coated eyepieces: a 1.25″ 25mm eyepiece for wide field views and a 1.25″ 10mm eyepiece for higher magnification. The Z130 performs better than other tabletop telescopes of a similar size, a difference you can see and appreciate under the stars thanks to its industry-leading optical components.

Advantages of Using the Zhumell Z130

Read on as I discuss the advantages of using the Zhumell Z130 Dobsonian telescope.

Ease of Use

One of the biggest advantages of using the Zhumell Z130 is its ease of use. The telescope is designed for users of all skill levels, from beginner to expert. Setting up the telescope is quick and easy and can be used without prior knowledge of astronomy.

Portability

The Zhumell Z130 telescope is designed to be compact and lightweight, making it easy to transport from one location to another. The telescope can be easily assembled and disassembled, making it a great choice for anyone who wants to take their telescope on the go.

Value for the Price

The Zhumell Z130 provides users with a high-quality Dobsonian telescope at an affordable price. The telescope is packed with features and provides users with great value for the price.

Great Optics

The Zhumell Z130 Dobsonian telescope features high-quality optics that provide users with clear night sky views. The telescope’s 130mm parabolic primary mirror eliminates spherical aberration, resulting in sharper images.

In addition, the telescope’s optics are fully multi-coated, which increases light transmission and provides brighter views.

Disadvantages of Using the Zhumell Z130

The Zhumell Z130 has a few disadvantages too:

Limited Magnification

The Zhumell Z130 Dobsonian telescope has a limited magnification of 300x. This is due to the telescope’s 130mm aperture.

While this is enough for most users, some users may find that they need a telescope with more power for certain tasks.

Inability to Collimate

The Zhumell Z130 Dobsonian telescope is not designed to be collimated. This means that the telescope’s optics will not be aligned properly, resulting in poorer image quality.

If you plan on using the telescope for high-resolution photography or astronomy, you may want to consider a different telescope.

Comparison of the Awb Onesky vs. Zhumell Z130

Now that we’ve looked at each telescope individually, let’s discuss the differences between the Awb Onesky and Zhumell Z130.

Collimation

Collimation is the process of aligning the optical components of a telescope. It is important to do this correctly to get the best possible image.

One big difference between these two telescopes is that for the Zhumell Z130, there is no way you can collimate the primary mirror. This is because it is a sealed unit and cannot be adjusted.

On the other hand, the Awb Onesky has a primary mirror you can collimate, which ensures you get the best possible image.

Ease of Use

Both of these telescopes are designed for ease of use, but there are some differences. The Zhumell Z130 requires no assembly, so it is ready to use right out of the box.

The Awb Onesky also requires no assembly, but it does need to be collimated before use. This process can be a bit tricky for beginners, so the Zhumell Z130 may be a better option if you are just starting out.

Optical Quality

The optical quality of these telescopes is very good for the price. However, there are some differences.

The Zhumell Z130 has a parabolic primary mirror, eliminating spherical aberration and other visual flaws. This results in sharper images.

The Awb Onesky also has high-quality optics, but the primary mirror is not parabolic.

Size

The Awb Onesky is a small telescope, thanks to its collapsible truss tube design. It weighs only 14 lbs and is only 14.” The Zhumell Z130 is slightly larger, weighing 22 lbs and measuring 36″ long.

Mount

One of the key differences between the Awb Onesky and Zhumell Z130 is that the Awb Onesky is on a Dobsonian mount while the Zhumell Z130 is on an alt-azimuth mount. The Dobsonian mount is a simple design that is easy to use and very stable.

The alt-azimuth mount is also easy to use but is not as stable as the Dobsonian mount.

Automated Control

The Zhumell Z130 is a Dobsonian telescope, which means it uses a simple design to provide excellent performance for its price range. The Zhumell Z130 is a great choice for beginners and experienced stargazers alike.

The Awb Onesky, on the other hand, is an automated telescope that is computer-controlled and requires very little user input. The Awb Onesky is a great choice for those who want the convenience of an automated telescope without sacrificing performance.

Style

The Awb Onesky is a Dobsonian-style telescope, which means it uses a simple Newtonian reflector design. The Zhumell Z130, on the other hand, is a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

This means that it uses a more complex optical system with a corrector plate at the front of the telescope.

Cost

The Dobsonian design is much simpler and cheaper to manufacture, which means that the Awb Onesky is a more affordable telescope. The Zhumell Z130, on the other hand, costs more money but provides better optics.

For this reason, the Zhumell Z130 is a better choice for serious amateur astronomers who want the best possible image quality.

How to Maintain Your Awb Onesky or Zhumell Telescope

You must take care of your telescope to ensure it lasts for many years. Here are some tips on how to maintain your Awb Onesky or Zhumell telescope:

Clean the Optics Regularly

Cleaning your telescope’s optics is important to ensure you get the best possible image. Using a soft, lint-free cloth, you should clean the optics at least once a month.

Store Your Telescope Properly

When you are not using your telescope, it is important to store it properly. This will help to protect the optics and prevent dust from accumulating on the lenses.

Check the Collimation Regularly

The Awb Onesky has a primary mirror that needs to be collimated regularly. This process can be tricky, so it is important to read the instructions carefully.

The Zhumell Z130 does not need to be collimated because it is a sealed unit.

Be Careful When Handling the Telescope

It is important to handle your telescope carefully to avoid damaging the optics. When transporting your telescope, ensure it is secure and protected from bumps.

Final Thoughts

The differences between the Awb Onesky and Zhumell Z130 are small, but they can make a big difference in your telescope experience. The Awb Onesky is a great choice for beginners and experienced stargazers alike.

I hope this article has helped you understand the differences between these two telescopes. Thanks for reading.


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