Best Telescope Eyepieces For Viewing Planets (No. 3 Is Sleek)

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Best Telescope Eyepieces For Viewing Planets

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Telescope eyepieces come in all shapes and sizes, but which one is right for you? If you’re looking to view planets, you’ll want to read this review on the best telescope eyepieces for viewing planets.

Number 3 on our list is a sleek and sophisticated eyepiece that is perfect for planetary viewing. Read on for a comprehensive guide and tips for choosing the right telescope eyepiece for your needs.

In a hurry? Here are the best picks. More info is below.

How to Choose the Best Telescope for Viewing Planets

Choosing the best telescope for your needs requires some research. But with this guide, you’ll be able to make an informed decision in no time.

Here are some factors to consider:

Magnification

Telescope eyepieces come in a range of magnifications, from low to high. The maximum magnification you need will depend on the planets you want to view.

For example, if you want to see Jupiter and its moons, you’ll need a telescope with at least 150x magnification. Be sure to check the telescope’s specs before making your purchase.

Aperture

The aperture is the diameter of the telescope’s main mirror or lens. The larger the aperture, the more light the telescope can gather, and the better the image will be.

For planetary viewing, a telescope with an aperture of at least 60mm is recommended. It is important, however, not to sacrifice image quality for quantity. A telescope with a smaller aperture but better optics will produce a clearer image than a telescope with a large aperture and poor optics.

Focal Length

Magnification focal length is the distance from the primary mirror or lens to the eyepiece. The longer the focal length, the higher the magnification.

For example, a telescope with a focal length of 1000mm will have a higher magnification than a telescope with a focal length of 500mm.

Keep in mind that telescopes with long focal lengths can be cumbersome and difficult to set up. If you’re a beginner, it’s best to start with a telescope that has a shorter focal length.

You can always upgrade to a longer focal length later on.

Size of the eyepiece

The size of the eyepiece is an important consideration, as it will determine whether or not it will fit in your telescope. Most eyepieces come with a 1.25-inch or a 2-inch barrel.

You want to make sure that the eyepiece you choose will fit snugly in your telescope.

Cost

Of course, the cost is always a factor to consider when making any purchase. But it’s important to remember that you get what you pay for.

A more expensive telescope doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s better quality, but it is likely to have better optics and features. It’s up to you to decide how much you’re willing to spend on your telescope.

Field of view

The field of view is the width of the area of deep sky you can see through the eyepiece. The larger the field of view, the more of the sky you’ll be able to take in at once.

For planetary viewing, a wide field of view is not as important as it is for other types of astronomical observing, observing planets such as star clusters or nebulae.

Eye relief

This is the distance between your eye and the eyepiece lens. If you wear glasses, you’ll want to make sure that the telescope eyepiece you choose has enough eye relief for you to be able to see through it without taking your glasses off.

Accessories

What other accessories does the eyepiece you want to buy come with? Some brands will sell eyepieces with a T-adapter, which will allow you to attach a camera to your telescope.

Others come with Barlow lenses, which increase the magnification of the eyepiece. Be sure to check what extras are included before making your purchase.

Quality

The optical quality part of the eyepiece is important as it will determine the quality of the image you see. When it comes to telescopes, you really do get what you pay.

A more expensive telescope will likely have better optics and a clearer image.

Warranty

Finally, be sure to check the warranty that comes with the eyepiece. Most manufacturers will offer a one-year warranty for this high magnification eyepiece, but some may offer more. It’s always best to buy from a company that offers a good warranty in case something goes wrong with your purchase.

4 Best Telescope Eyepieces for Viewing Planets

Celestron 1.25″ Universal Barlow and T-Adapter

Best Budget
Celestron 1.25

The Celestron Universal Barlow lens is our pick for the best budget telescope eyepiece. It’s a great all-purpose lens that can be used for both visual and photographic purposes.

With a maximum focal length of 1.25mm, the Celestron Universal Barlow lens will allow you to increase the magnification of your telescope. It also comes with a T-adapter, which means you can use it for prime focus photography or tele-extended photography.

The tele-extended photography is especially useful for taking pictures of distant objects, such as the moon or planets.

I must also mention the manual focus feature. This is a great feature for those who want to be able to fine-tune the focus of their telescope. The Celestron Universal Barlow lens is a great all-purpose telescope eyepiece that won’t break the bank.

Verdict: If you are on a budget and are looking for a versatile telescope eyepiece, the Celestron Universal Barlow lens is a great option. The manual focus feature is especially handy, and the included T-adapter means you can use it for prime focus photography or tele-extended photography.

Key Features:

  • Lens type: Telephoto
  • Maximum focal length: 1.25mm
  • Manual focus
  • Comes with a T-adapter
  • Prime focus photography
  • Tele-extended photography with T-adapter

Pros
  • Affordable
  • Comes with a T-adapter
  • Manual focus feature
  • Great for visual and photographic purposes
Cons
  • Some users have reported that the image is not as sharp as they would like it to be.

Explore Scientific 11mm Waterproof Telescope Eyepiece

Best Overall
Explore Scientific 11mm Waterproof Telescope Eyepiece

The Explore Scientific 82-Degree 11mm Waterproof Telescope Eyepiece is our pick for the best overall telescope eyepiece. It’s also a great all-purpose lens that can be used for both visual and photographic purposes.

With an 82-degree apparent field of view, this eyepiece will give you a wide, panoramic view of the night sky. You can also fine-tune the focus with the manual focus feature.

The eyepiece is also waterproof and gas purged, which means you won’t have to worry about moisture or dust getting into the lens. Gas purging is a great feature, as it prevents fogging of the lens in humid conditions.

The Explore Scientific 82-Degree 11mm Waterproof Telescope Eyepiece also comes with a reflex finderscope. This is a great accessory for those who want to be able to quickly locate objects in the night sky.

The black internal and edge surfaces help to reduce reflections. This means you’ll be able to see more of the night sky, and not just reflections. Finally, the Enhanced Multilayer Deposition coatings help to reduce glare and improve contrast for sharp images.

Verdict: If you are looking for a top-of-the-line telescope eyepiece, the Explore Scientific 82-Degree 11mm Waterproof Telescope Eyepiece is a great option. It’s packed with features, such as a wide-field eyepiece, manual focus, waterproof and gas-purged design, and a reflex finderscope. I particularly liked the black internal and edge surfaces, as they help to reduce reflections. This is a great telescope eyepiece for those who want the best of the best.

Key Features:

  • Wide field eyepiece: 82-degree, apparent
  • Manual focus
  • Waterproof and gas purged
  • Focal length: 11mm
  • Reflex finderscope
  • Black internal and edge surfaces
  • Enhanced Multilayer Deposition coatings

Pros
  • Wide field eyepiece
  • Waterproof
  • Gas purged
  • Black internal and edge surfaces
Cons
  • Quite pricey

Celestron – Zoom Eyepiece for Telescope

Best Zoom Eyepiece
Celestron - Zoom Eyepiece for Telescope

The Celestron Zoom Eyepiece for Telescope is among the best zoom telescope eyepieces on the market. It has a zoom telescope focal length of between 8mm and 24mm. This is a huge zoom range good quality eyepiece, which means that you can get a close-up view of distant objects.

The eyepiece also has a field of view of between 40 and 60 degrees. This is a great feature, as it allows you to see more of the night sky.

At 60 degrees, you’ll be able to zoom in on a larger area of the sky. The eye relief is also between 15mm and 18mm. This is a good range, as it means you won’t have to strain your eyes to see the night sky.

The Celestron Zoom Eyepiece for Telescope also has a number of other great features. It has a manual focus, which means you can fine-tune the focus. The eyepiece is also fully multi-coated. This helps to reduce reflections and glare. Finally, the eyepiece comes with a carrying case.

Verdict: Looking for a zoom telescope eyepiece? Then the Celestron Zoom Eyepiece for Telescope is a great option. It has a large maximum focal length and it’s fully multi-coated. I liked the eye relief range and the carrying case. The only downside is that it has a 1.25″ barrel, which limits the telescopes it works with.

Key Features:

  • Zoom focal length: 8mm-24mm
  • 1.25-inch barrel
  • Focus type: Manual focus
  • Fully multi-coated eyepiece
  • Field of view: 40-60 degrees
  • Eye relief: 15mm-18mm

Pros
  • Large zoom focal length
  • 60-degree field of view
  • Eye relief
  • Comes with a carrying case
  • Fairly-priced
Cons
  • 1.25″ barrel limits the telescopes it works with

Orion 1.25-Inch Premium Telescope Accessory Kit

Best Eyepiece Kit
Orion 1.25-Inch Premium Telescope Accessory Kit

Looking for a telescope eyepiece kit that will give you a lot of bang for your buck? Then check out the Orion Premium Telescope Accessory Kit. It comes with 12 accessories, which include 5 eyepieces, 6 eyepiece filters, and a Barlow lens.

The eyepieces come with different focal lengths. There is a 40mm eyepiece, which is great for wide-field views. There is also a 17mm front eyepiece focal length, which is good for medium-range views. For close-up views, there are three wide angle eyepieces at 10mm, a 7.5mm, and a 6.3mm eyepiece.

The kit also includes a 13% transmission neutral-density Moon filter. This is a great feature, as it allows you to view the Moon in all its glory.

The kit also comes with a Barlow lens. The lens doubles the magnification of the eyepieces. This is a great feature, as it allows you to get a more crisp and sharp image with a closer view of distant objects.

The Orion Premium Telescope Accessory Kit is a great option for those who are looking for an all-in-one kit. It’s fairly priced, and it comes with everything you need to get started.

Verdict: There are so many great features that come with the Orion Premium Telescope Accessory Kit. It’s a great option for those who are looking for an all-in-one kit. It’s fairly priced, and it comes with everything you need to get started. The only downside is that it’s only compatible with telescopes that have a barrel size of 1.25″. However, you can still use it with a number of different telescopes.

Key Features:

  • Objective lens diameter: 40mm
  • Reflex finderscope
  • Focus type: Manual focus
  • 1.25″ barrel
  • The kit comes with 12 accessories: 6 eyepiece filters, 5 eyepieces, and a Barlow lens
  • Lens focal lengths: 40mm, 17mm, 10mm, 7.5mm, and 6.3mm
  • 13% transmission neutral-density Moon filter
  • 2x Barlow lens doubles magnification

Pros
  • Comes with 12 accessories
  • Barlow lens doubles magnification
  • Includes a neutral-density Moon filter
  • Fairly priced
Cons
  • Only compatible with 1.25″ barrels

Best Telescope Eyepieces for Viewing Planets FAQs

What is the best telescope eyepiece for viewing planets?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as it depends on your needs and preferences. However, some of the best options include the Celestron Zoom Eyepiece for Telescope and the Orion Premium Telescope Accessory Kit.

How do I choose a telescope eyepiece?

When choosing a telescope eyepiece, there are a few things you need to consider. First, think about the focal length premium eyepiece you need. If you want to view distant objects, you will need an eyepiece with a long focal length.

If you want to view close-up objects, you will need an eyepiece with a short focal length. Read our buyer’s guide above for more tips on choosing the right focal length telescope eyepiece.

What is the difference between a Barlow lens and a telescope eyepiece?

A Barlow lens is a type of lens that is used to increase the magnification or apparent field of view of an eyepiece. A telescope eyepiece is a type of lens that is used to view distant objects.

What is the good eyepiece magnification for planet viewing?

The good eyepiece magnification for planet viewing depends on the planet you want to view. If you want to view a distant planet, you will need an eyepiece with at least 150x magnification.

Note also that if you need a higher resolution, you will require an eyepiece with larger magnification.

What is the best eyepiece to see Saturn and Jupiter?

High magnification is key here. How much magnification? You are looking at a magnification of at least 150x. The higher the number, the better.

Be sure also to get an eyepiece with a wide field of view. This will allow you to see more of the planet at once.

Final Thoughts

There are so many telescope eyepieces on the market today. It can be hard to know which one is right for you. However, I hope our buyer’s guide has helped you narrow your options.

Remember to consider the factors we mentioned above when making your decision. Choose from the products I have listed above, and you can’t go wrong. Thanks for reading.


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